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Is your child’s backpack too heavy?

Improper backpack use can cause injury, especially to children with young, growing muscles and joints.

A recent study found 55% of the children surveyed carried backpack loads heavier than 15% of their body weight, the maximum safe weight for children recommended by most experts.

A child trying to adapt to a heavy backpack load can contribute to harmful postures such as arching the back, leaning forward or, if only one strap is being used, leaning to one side. This can cause spinal and/or nerve compression, improper alignment and leave the back more vulnerable to injury.

Let us help you or your child adapt properly to school conditions without “breaking their back”! Give us a call today at 920-235-8966😄

*For more information visit apta.org

Josie carrying her backpack incorrectly. Using only one strap causes one shoulder to bear the weight of the bag. This can lead to serious back or musculoskeletal damage.

*Information brought to you by apta.org
*For demonstrative purposes only

Josie is now wearing her backpack properly. It is very important to wear both straps to better distribute the weight of the backpack, promoting symmetrical posture. A backpack that has padded, contoured shoulder straps will also help reduce pressure on the chests and shoulders.

*Information brought to you by apta.org
*For demonstrative purposes only

Conner is also carrying his backpack incorrectly. Parents should look for the following signs that the backpack is too heavy or being worn improperly: pain when wearing the backpack, tingling or numbness in the arms, and/ or red marks on the shoulders.

*Information brought to you by apta.org
*For demonstrative purposes only

Although it may be hard, carrying a light load in a backpack is ideal. Some children may find backpacks with wheels a good option. Be smart and don’t “break your back”!

*Information brought to you by apta.org
*For demonstrative purposes only

Conner is now wearing his backpack correctly! It is also very important to make sure your backpack fits. The size of the backpack should match the size of the child. Shoulder straps should fit comfortably on the shoulder and under arms, so that the arms can move freely. The bottom of the backpack should rest in the contour of the lower back. The pack should “sit” evenly in the middle of the back, not “sag down” towards the buttocks.

*Information brought to you by apta.org
*For demonstrative purposes only

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